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THESIS DEFENCE

Multi-scale evaluation of the environmental consequences of eco-design strategies for the built environment

Thursday, 2024.07.04, 9AM

Local C1-3114, Faculty of Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, QC, Canada

Image_Kikki.jpg

- PhD candidate : Kikki Lambrecht Ipsen -

Video Conference Link : Click here [Meeting ID: 257 118 424 091 | Secret code: KsNXWt]

English

Project Summary

This thesis quantifies the environmental consequences of applying eco-design strategies in the building sector and prioritize them across multiple impact categories. These strategies are believed to be environmentally beneficial, however quantitative evidence of this is lacking. The environmental performance of the eco-design strategies was quantified using consequential life cycle assessment (LCA), both on an urban scale and on a building scale where the consequences were evaluated in relation to various building components. From this study it is recommended to prioritize the use of biotic materials, followed by inert natural materials, inorganic materials, and finally reclaimed materials for construction purposes, however it is also recommended to differentiate the applied eco-design strategies across different building components. This study offers new quantitative insights into the effectiveness of eco-design strategies in reducing environmental impacts and focal points for building designers interested in implementing eco-design practices. 

Copy of thesis
For a copy of the thesis, please email info@liride.info.

Graduate program : Civil Engineering

Project Highlights

This research project aims to:

  • Identify existing tools and methods relevant for eco-designing buildings.

  • An identified eco-design method relevant for eco-designing buildings are the so-called eco-design strategies. This project aims at addressing the lack of sufficient quantitative evidence regarding the effectiveness of the eco-design strategies in reducing environmental impacts.

  • Quantify the environmental consequences of applying the eco-design strategies on multiply scales and in multiple ways of application to fully explore the eco-design strategies potential for impact mitigation.

  • Prioritize the eco-design strategies based on their mitigation potential across multiple environmental impact categories.

 
Results of this research project:

  • Identify that a method for eco-design is through the application of numerous eco-design strategies that provides clear guidance and focal points during the design stage.

  • No single eco-design strategy should be prioritized over another. The greatest mitigation potential arises when applying a combination of strategies and by differentiating eco-design strategies across different building components.

  • Recommend that materials should generally be used in the following prioritized order, biotic materials, inert natural materials, inorganic materials, reclaimed materials, however there are exceptions to this rule for certain building components and types.

  • Provide new quantitative insights into the effectiveness of eco-design strategies in reducing environmental impacts and offering practical recommendations for building designers interested in implementing eco-design practices.

Assessment committee

  • Pr. Pierre LABOSSIÈRE, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, CA 

  • Pr. José CANDANEDO, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, CA

  • Pr. Harpa BIRGISDOTTIR, Dept. of the Built Environment, Aalborg Universitet, DK

  • Dr. Charlotte Roux,  Research engineer MINES Paris - PSL, FR

PhD supervisors

Supervisor

  • Pr. Ben AMOR, Dept. of Civil and Building Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, CA

Co-supervisors

  • Pr. Massimo PIZZOL, Dept. of Sustainability and Planning, Aalborg Universitet, DK

  • Pr. Morten BIRKVERD, Dept. of Green Technology, Syddansk Universitet, DK

Acknowledgement

Acknowledgments are extended to the organizations and institutions that provided funding for this research. The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) is thanked for its essential financial support. The Initiative for Industrialized construction is (ICI) also appreciated for their financial contributions.

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